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Death is a part of me and always will be.

Last night, I finished the long-awaited Smoke Gets in Your Eyes: And Other Lessons from the Crematory by Caitlin Doughty and my mind is still reeling. When the book arrived, I tore open the package and read the entire thing in a single day. I have so much to say and I know this is one of those books that’s going to stick with me for a long time. I don’t usually have any sort of intimate share time on here, but this is really important to me, so I’m going to talk about how death has shaped me and why I think this book is so important. 

Growing up as the daughter of a pediatric ICU nurse, I was an extremely morbid child who feared that death could come for me any day and often worried myself sick over it. This manifested itself in many unhealthy ways, from voraciously reading through my mom’s medical books and convincing myself that I had any number of terminal illnesses, to visiting my mom at work and thinking that hospitals were engulfed in a miasma of death that you could somehow contract like a disease simply by walking in; among many other strange, neurotic behaviors. I desperately wanted to understand death, but felt sorely lacking in the tools to do so and I didn’t know how to ask for help either.

I was frustrated and angry that no one wanted to talk about it, but also too afraid to bring up such a taboo subject for fear of seeming psychologically unsound (even though my coping mechanisms were poor and I definitely could have benefited from some therapy). It wasn’t until I read Elisabeth Kübler-Ross’s On Death and Dying at age 16 that I finally began my long journey toward death acceptance. This book was pretty life changing, but I still wanted to know more. The only other book about death my school library had was Ernest Becker’s The Denial of Death, so I read that too. I was finally reading about the things I had been feeling, but never had the words for, and it felt extremely validating. 

Though more informed, I still had so many questions and concerns, some of which made me feel ashamed. What does an unpreserved dead body look like in person? What if I die suddenly and my wishes regarding my body go unspoken and unfulfilled? Is it weird that I feel I’ve missed opportunities for closure by not being allowed to see the corpses of loved ones in the past? I continued to pursue my complicated relationship with death through my teens and early 20s with macabre literature and art, while also wondering if I had any place in the funeral industry. 

These are all questions that only started to be answered about 3 years ago when I came upon The Order of the Good Death. I discovered radical concepts like home death care and natural burial. Smoke Gets in Your Eyes struck a great balance between philosophical musings, some history of death rituals, and hard facts about what happens to your body when you die. Our society’s grasp of death is tenuous at best, and this is a concern that Doughty addresses with humor, wit, and refreshingly unyielding candor. It was comforting and made me feel a little less alone by addressing all the things I always want to talk about. Doughty speaks a lot about being more involved in the care of our dead, and the disconnect that currently exists between the corpse of a loved one and the ambiguous in-between after which they are quickly taken away to typically be embalmed or cremated. I still recall never seeing the corpse of my grandma as a child; only being told that she had finally died after months of painfully witnessing her wither away under hospice care and a few days later emptily gazing upon her casket. Or how just last year, my beloved rabbit Megatron died naturally in my arms at the vet, after which they abruptly took him from me; an instance where I still feel traumatized by the inability to properly mourn a pet that I deeply loved because at the time, I didn’t know I could take his body home.

I still think about death pretty much on a daily basis, but now in a way that makes me feel more invigorated and alive rather than sick and afraid. These days, I’m trying to make a living as an artist, while satisfying my preoccupation with death by taking the occasional taxidermy class, drawing things like fetal skulls, or designing shirts with a sketch of some dead person’s hand I studied at a dissection workshop. Though I sometimes still believe a career in death is calling me, I remain unsure if I have the gumption to enter and work to change an industry I take issue with at large. For now, I will continue to educate myself and admire/share the important death positive efforts of people like Doughty.

strawberryjizzbomb:

fake-suicide-of-genius:

theyearoftherequiem:

frenums: 

skeleton smartypants was defeated once and for all

THE REACTION FACES JUST MAKE THIS 84927 TIMES FUNNIER

This is my kind of humor

(via amazingexplodingwoman)

Sabbath Night 22x30”

Prep work is done and now I can finally schedule some time in the lab to screen print these for a special Halloween release! Thinking about doing an edition of 10-15 of the black and white version, and a special edition of 5 for the 3 color version.

Also, the colors are approximate; not sure what kind of inks I’ll have access to at the lab!

terezipyroope:

person: u should like more colours

me: image

(Source: realterezipyrope, via unspokenagreement)

I will also be selling a few shirts tomorrow at Brooklyn Night Bazaar at the cuttersmusic merch table. Only 2 wolf tanks left! $25 each.

I will also be selling a few shirts tomorrow at Brooklyn Night Bazaar at the cuttersmusic merch table. Only 2 wolf tanks left! $25 each.

cuttersmusic:

PATCHES by danaglover of The Black Rabbit
$5. Available at our show on Saturday with Cerebral Ballzy!
The Black Rabbit on Facebook.The Black Rabbit on Etsy.

Just printed these babies today. Come say hi and see some great bands at Brooklyn Night Bazaar this Saturday night!

cuttersmusic:

PATCHES by danaglover of The Black Rabbit

$5. Available at our show on Saturday with Cerebral Ballzy!

The Black Rabbit on Facebook.
The Black Rabbit on Etsy.

Just printed these babies today. Come say hi and see some great bands at Brooklyn Night Bazaar this Saturday night!

artifuss:

transhumanisticpanspermia:

failmacaw:

nightmargin:

W E L C O M E

B  E    O  U  R    G  U  E  S  T

these skeletons look legitimately friendly and inviting, i don’t know about you guys but i’m hella stoked to kick it with these skeletons

The skeleton quotient of my tumbie is great and growing

Skeletons forever.

artifuss:

transhumanisticpanspermia:

failmacaw:

nightmargin:

W E L C O M E

B  E    O  U  R    G  U  E  S  T

these skeletons look legitimately friendly and inviting, i don’t know about you guys but i’m hella stoked to kick it with these skeletons

The skeleton quotient of my tumbie is great and growing

Skeletons forever.

Very pleased that my in home screen printing set up is working out. First screen successfully exposed and now drying! If all continues to go well, I’ll be at Brooklyn Night Bazaar this Saturday selling patches for Cutters! #screenprinting #diy #cuttersmusic

Very pleased that my in home screen printing set up is working out. First screen successfully exposed and now drying! If all continues to go well, I’ll be at Brooklyn Night Bazaar this Saturday selling patches for Cutters! #screenprinting #diy #cuttersmusic

treadmill-to-oblivion:

Gillian Anderson as Morticia Addams by Mark Seliger.

This picture is everything to me right now and is making me have many feelings.

treadmill-to-oblivion:

Gillian Anderson as Morticia Addams by Mark Seliger.

This picture is everything to me right now and is making me have many feelings.

(Source: humus.livejournal.com)

Color separations. I’m feeling this purple. #silkscreening #wip

Color separations. I’m feeling this purple. #silkscreening #wip

lovelyandbrown:

grandmasterbooty:

Distressing Video Captures EXACTLY How Cops Treat Black People

I had to reblog this again because it just reduced me to tears. 

As most of you know, I am an attorney. And I am an attorney licensed in Minnesota. This is the state where I took an oath last year to uphold state and federal laws and to protect the rights of the citizens.

It PAINS me to see this. To see these unjust cops who I for all intensive purposes, have to stand along side. When they are abusing EVERY SINGLE OUNCE of POWER. Minneapolis/St. Paul have BEEN a war zone. I’m ashamed. I’m embarrassed.

Not all officers are bad. Please don’t let that be the take away. But police brutality is VERY FUCKING REAL. 

Watch this. If this doesn’t move you, if this doesn’t make you cry out in agony and want to change the world, I don’t know what will.

[trigger warning]

Fuck cops forever. If you think police brutality has nothing to do with race and that white privilege doesn’t exist, fucking unfollow me right now.

majiinboo:

  • Do not forget Michael Brown
  • Do not forget how the media dehumanized him and tried to justify his murder
  • Do not forget how peaceful protests were painted as savage riots
  • Do not forget police armed with military grade weapons terrorized and arrested black civilians
  • Do not forget Darren Wilson being awarded over $200,000 in fundraiser donations for murdering an unarmed black child
  • Do not forget that this system was not built to defend us, but to control us
  • Do not forget Ferguson 

Death is a part of me and always will be.

Last night, I finished the long-awaited Smoke Gets in Your Eyes: And Other Lessons from the Crematory by Caitlin Doughty and my mind is still reeling. When the book arrived, I tore open the package and read the entire thing in a single day. I have so much to say and I know this is one of those books that’s going to stick with me for a long time. I don’t usually have any sort of intimate share time on here, but this is really important to me, so I’m going to talk about how death has shaped me and why I think this book is so important. 

Growing up as the daughter of a pediatric ICU nurse, I was an extremely morbid child who feared that death could come for me any day and often worried myself sick over it. This manifested itself in many unhealthy ways, from voraciously reading through my mom’s medical books and convincing myself that I had any number of terminal illnesses, to visiting my mom at work and thinking that hospitals were engulfed in a miasma of death that you could somehow contract like a disease simply by walking in; among many other strange, neurotic behaviors. I desperately wanted to understand death, but felt sorely lacking in the tools to do so and I didn’t know how to ask for help either.

I was frustrated and angry that no one wanted to talk about it, but also too afraid to bring up such a taboo subject for fear of seeming psychologically unsound (even though my coping mechanisms were poor and I definitely could have benefited from some therapy). It wasn’t until I read Elisabeth Kübler-Ross’s On Death and Dying at age 16 that I finally began my long journey toward death acceptance. This book was pretty life changing, but I still wanted to know more. The only other book about death my school library had was Ernest Becker’s The Denial of Death, so I read that too. I was finally reading about the things I had been feeling, but never had the words for, and it felt extremely validating. 

Though more informed, I still had so many questions and concerns, some of which made me feel ashamed. What does an unpreserved dead body look like in person? What if I die suddenly and my wishes regarding my body go unspoken and unfulfilled? Is it weird that I feel I’ve missed opportunities for closure by not being allowed to see the corpses of loved ones in the past? I continued to pursue my complicated relationship with death through my teens and early 20s with macabre literature and art, while also wondering if I had any place in the funeral industry. 

These are all questions that only started to be answered about 3 years ago when I came upon The Order of the Good Death. I discovered radical concepts like home death care and natural burial. Smoke Gets in Your Eyes struck a great balance between philosophical musings, some history of death rituals, and hard facts about what happens to your body when you die. Our society’s grasp of death is tenuous at best, and this is a concern that Doughty addresses with humor, wit, and refreshingly unyielding candor. It was comforting and made me feel a little less alone by addressing all the things I always want to talk about. Doughty speaks a lot about being more involved in the care of our dead, and the disconnect that currently exists between the corpse of a loved one and the ambiguous in-between after which they are quickly taken away to typically be embalmed or cremated. I still recall never seeing the corpse of my grandma as a child; only being told that she had finally died after months of painfully witnessing her wither away under hospice care and a few days later emptily gazing upon her casket. Or how just last year, my beloved rabbit Megatron died naturally in my arms at the vet, after which they abruptly took him from me; an instance where I still feel traumatized by the inability to properly mourn a pet that I deeply loved because at the time, I didn’t know I could take his body home.

I still think about death pretty much on a daily basis, but now in a way that makes me feel more invigorated and alive rather than sick and afraid. These days, I’m trying to make a living as an artist, while satisfying my preoccupation with death by taking the occasional taxidermy class, drawing things like fetal skulls, or designing shirts with a sketch of some dead person’s hand I studied at a dissection workshop. Though I sometimes still believe a career in death is calling me, I remain unsure if I have the gumption to enter and work to change an industry I take issue with at large. For now, I will continue to educate myself and admire/share the important death positive efforts of people like Doughty.

strawberryjizzbomb:

fake-suicide-of-genius:

theyearoftherequiem:

frenums: 

skeleton smartypants was defeated once and for all

THE REACTION FACES JUST MAKE THIS 84927 TIMES FUNNIER

This is my kind of humor

(via amazingexplodingwoman)

Sabbath Night 22x30”

Prep work is done and now I can finally schedule some time in the lab to screen print these for a special Halloween release! Thinking about doing an edition of 10-15 of the black and white version, and a special edition of 5 for the 3 color version.

Also, the colors are approximate; not sure what kind of inks I’ll have access to at the lab!

terezipyroope:

person: u should like more colours

me: image

(Source: realterezipyrope, via unspokenagreement)

I will also be selling a few shirts tomorrow at Brooklyn Night Bazaar at the cuttersmusic merch table. Only 2 wolf tanks left! $25 each.

I will also be selling a few shirts tomorrow at Brooklyn Night Bazaar at the cuttersmusic merch table. Only 2 wolf tanks left! $25 each.

cuttersmusic:

PATCHES by danaglover of The Black Rabbit
$5. Available at our show on Saturday with Cerebral Ballzy!
The Black Rabbit on Facebook.The Black Rabbit on Etsy.

Just printed these babies today. Come say hi and see some great bands at Brooklyn Night Bazaar this Saturday night!

cuttersmusic:

PATCHES by danaglover of The Black Rabbit

$5. Available at our show on Saturday with Cerebral Ballzy!

The Black Rabbit on Facebook.
The Black Rabbit on Etsy.

Just printed these babies today. Come say hi and see some great bands at Brooklyn Night Bazaar this Saturday night!

artifuss:

transhumanisticpanspermia:

failmacaw:

nightmargin:

W E L C O M E

B  E    O  U  R    G  U  E  S  T

these skeletons look legitimately friendly and inviting, i don’t know about you guys but i’m hella stoked to kick it with these skeletons

The skeleton quotient of my tumbie is great and growing

Skeletons forever.

artifuss:

transhumanisticpanspermia:

failmacaw:

nightmargin:

W E L C O M E

B  E    O  U  R    G  U  E  S  T

these skeletons look legitimately friendly and inviting, i don’t know about you guys but i’m hella stoked to kick it with these skeletons

The skeleton quotient of my tumbie is great and growing

Skeletons forever.

Very pleased that my in home screen printing set up is working out. First screen successfully exposed and now drying! If all continues to go well, I’ll be at Brooklyn Night Bazaar this Saturday selling patches for Cutters! #screenprinting #diy #cuttersmusic

Very pleased that my in home screen printing set up is working out. First screen successfully exposed and now drying! If all continues to go well, I’ll be at Brooklyn Night Bazaar this Saturday selling patches for Cutters! #screenprinting #diy #cuttersmusic

murderous-moon:

danaglover these are for you

murderous-moon:

danaglover these are for you

(Source: danial-ryan)

treadmill-to-oblivion:

Gillian Anderson as Morticia Addams by Mark Seliger.

This picture is everything to me right now and is making me have many feelings.

treadmill-to-oblivion:

Gillian Anderson as Morticia Addams by Mark Seliger.

This picture is everything to me right now and is making me have many feelings.

(Source: humus.livejournal.com)

Color separations. I’m feeling this purple. #silkscreening #wip

Color separations. I’m feeling this purple. #silkscreening #wip

lovelyandbrown:

grandmasterbooty:

Distressing Video Captures EXACTLY How Cops Treat Black People

I had to reblog this again because it just reduced me to tears. 

As most of you know, I am an attorney. And I am an attorney licensed in Minnesota. This is the state where I took an oath last year to uphold state and federal laws and to protect the rights of the citizens.

It PAINS me to see this. To see these unjust cops who I for all intensive purposes, have to stand along side. When they are abusing EVERY SINGLE OUNCE of POWER. Minneapolis/St. Paul have BEEN a war zone. I’m ashamed. I’m embarrassed.

Not all officers are bad. Please don’t let that be the take away. But police brutality is VERY FUCKING REAL. 

Watch this. If this doesn’t move you, if this doesn’t make you cry out in agony and want to change the world, I don’t know what will.

[trigger warning]

Fuck cops forever. If you think police brutality has nothing to do with race and that white privilege doesn’t exist, fucking unfollow me right now.

majiinboo:

  • Do not forget Michael Brown
  • Do not forget how the media dehumanized him and tried to justify his murder
  • Do not forget how peaceful protests were painted as savage riots
  • Do not forget police armed with military grade weapons terrorized and arrested black civilians
  • Do not forget Darren Wilson being awarded over $200,000 in fundraiser donations for murdering an unarmed black child
  • Do not forget that this system was not built to defend us, but to control us
  • Do not forget Ferguson 

nomadicphoto:

Ronyca - Williamsburg, NY.

by Emmanuel Afolabi

(via darshanapathak)

Death is a part of me and always will be.

About:

Dana is an illustrator living and working out of Brooklyn, NY.

www.dana-glover.com.

You can also find me here:

etsy | twitter | facebook | instagram | ask

Following:

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